So true!

(Source: kateordie, via althea-saint-bookreturn)

Haters gonna hate.

stand-up-comic-gifs:

He’s just mad because he can’t acquire all the apple juice that I’m acquiring. (x)

(via phendrana)

sexedconfidential:

"I began menstruation at an uncommonly young age. The only information I possessed at that time was that “as soon as you get your period you can get pregnant,” wisdom passed down to me very sternly from my father, with the implication that pregnancy would ruin my life. When my first period ended I…

erikawithac: thevitaes:


tw for vagueish description of, um. oh jeez how do i warn for this? ableist assaultish stuff?
sheikofthesheikah: jewlo:


As a person with severe and very frequent seizures, I am constantly in fear of other people’s lack of knowledge about my condition. There are a lot of epilepsy myths and whenever someone has a seizure, there is ALWAYS some self important douche that insists he/she knows what she is doing because they took a semester of nursing school in 1976. I have had seizures in public places many times (my seizures are almost daily) and I have had people try to stick dirty spoons in my mouth, their wallets, rolled up cloth napkins and all sorts of gross and dangerous things. I have had people start praying because they think I am possessed by the devil (seriously), and I have had people put me in their car and drive me to their home (which is terrifying, and sort of kidnap). 
One of the worst parts about having epilepsy in my opinion is having to trust other people, usually strangers, not just because I don’t trust strangers but also because I don’t feel ok about putting a responsibility in their hands that they did not sign on for. Because my seizures are almost daily, I am almost always accompanied by my husband or a friend or assistant who knows how to deal with my condition and has agreed to do so, but I can’t be watched 24 hours a day.
This evening, I went shopping with a friend who is a bit shy and not very assertive. (She is lovely, I adore her, but she is not used to people’s reactions when I have a seizure. She did not know that there is always that one self important douche in every crowd.) I had a seizure. Of course, that one self important douche was there - a man in his late 50’s who insisted on putting something in my mouth; in this case his wallet which had a metal closure and frame that covered most of it. My friend repeatedly asked him to stop and he did not. Unfortunately, my friend was not very assertive (not her fault, she is just sweet and shy) and the guy  pushed her out of the way and took over, even as she explained that you’re not supposed to do that with epileptics. He insisted that in the army in the 70’s, that’s the way it was done. My friend argued that this was not the army, nor the 70’s, but he would not listen and she kind of froze up.
The result is that I now have seven stitches in the side of my left cheek and a chipped front tooth, both caused by the man’s metal wallet cutting my face open. 
Please, if you know someone with a seizure disorder, take a few minutes to learn how to deal with a seizure. It isn’t complicated and your knowing and being ready and ok with helping will relieve a lot of fear. Please take the time to pass this on, as it could save someone’s life, or at least their face.

It’s also important to remember not to hold us down. Seizures look scary (I’ve never seen what I look like having one, but I’m very aware of what happens), but holding someone down while in status epilepticus is dangerous both to you and the fitting person. 
It’s far more safer to let us flail, drool everywhere and pee ourselves as is so flatteringly common, and then comfort us as we come around, explaining what happened to us.
Far too often I’ve come out of a seizure with someone who did first aid in 1980 putting their entire bodyweight on me. Let me tell you, it’s fucking terrifying. I’ve become aggressive when post-ictal, and once gave the first aid officer at my old work a job in the mouth when she wouldn’t get off me. 
Someone coming out of a seizure may be unpredictable. It is far safer for you, as the bystander, and the person fitting, to simply clear the area, make sure their head is protected and then wait for them to come out of it, at which point you can reassure them.


EXTREMELY important knowledge

erikawithac: thevitaes:

tw for vagueish description of, um. oh jeez how do i warn for this? ableist assaultish stuff?

sheikofthesheikah: jewlo:

As a person with severe and very frequent seizures, I am constantly in fear of other people’s lack of knowledge about my condition. There are a lot of epilepsy myths and whenever someone has a seizure, there is ALWAYS some self important douche that insists he/she knows what she is doing because they took a semester of nursing school in 1976. I have had seizures in public places many times (my seizures are almost daily) and I have had people try to stick dirty spoons in my mouth, their wallets, rolled up cloth napkins and all sorts of gross and dangerous things. I have had people start praying because they think I am possessed by the devil (seriously), and I have had people put me in their car and drive me to their home (which is terrifying, and sort of kidnap). 

One of the worst parts about having epilepsy in my opinion is having to trust other people, usually strangers, not just because I don’t trust strangers but also because I don’t feel ok about putting a responsibility in their hands that they did not sign on for. Because my seizures are almost daily, I am almost always accompanied by my husband or a friend or assistant who knows how to deal with my condition and has agreed to do so, but I can’t be watched 24 hours a day.

This evening, I went shopping with a friend who is a bit shy and not very assertive. (She is lovely, I adore her, but she is not used to people’s reactions when I have a seizure. She did not know that there is always that one self important douche in every crowd.) I had a seizure. Of course, that one self important douche was there - a man in his late 50’s who insisted on putting something in my mouth; in this case his wallet which had a metal closure and frame that covered most of it. My friend repeatedly asked him to stop and he did not. Unfortunately, my friend was not very assertive (not her fault, she is just sweet and shy) and the guy  pushed her out of the way and took over, even as she explained that you’re not supposed to do that with epileptics. He insisted that in the army in the 70’s, that’s the way it was done. My friend argued that this was not the army, nor the 70’s, but he would not listen and she kind of froze up.

The result is that I now have seven stitches in the side of my left cheek and a chipped front tooth, both caused by the man’s metal wallet cutting my face open. 

Please, if you know someone with a seizure disorder, take a few minutes to learn how to deal with a seizure. It isn’t complicated and your knowing and being ready and ok with helping will relieve a lot of fear. Please take the time to pass this on, as it could save someone’s life, or at least their face.

It’s also important to remember not to hold us down. Seizures look scary (I’ve never seen what I look like having one, but I’m very aware of what happens), but holding someone down while in status epilepticus is dangerous both to you and the fitting person. 

It’s far more safer to let us flail, drool everywhere and pee ourselves as is so flatteringly common, and then comfort us as we come around, explaining what happened to us.

Far too often I’ve come out of a seizure with someone who did first aid in 1980 putting their entire bodyweight on me. Let me tell you, it’s fucking terrifying. I’ve become aggressive when post-ictal, and once gave the first aid officer at my old work a job in the mouth when she wouldn’t get off me. 

Someone coming out of a seizure may be unpredictable. It is far safer for you, as the bystander, and the person fitting, to simply clear the area, make sure their head is protected and then wait for them to come out of it, at which point you can reassure them.

EXTREMELY important knowledge

(via misamdry)

Anonymous asked: My Sex Education at school began in grade nine. We watched movies showing the process of frog reproduction, which has nothing even remotely in common with how humans reproduce.

Hello Tumblr! My daughter, Raven, has a social media project that she is conducting for her Women and Gender Studies class at the UofA where she is collecting stories about the myths and misconceptions we had as kids and during puberty about our sexuality and our understanding about sex or our experiences from sex ed.

You can submit anonymous comments on her blog athttp://sexedconfidential.tumblr.com/ by selecting the “ask me anything” box. Just write in your comments as there is no need to sign up. You can also read some of the other submissions on the blog. 

If you have a twitter Raven also has an account with submission highlights athttp://www.twitter.com/sexedcon and she’d love to have a follow and a retweet if you find something you’d like to share with your followers. 

Please feel free to reblog this for anyone else you know who might have a story to share. By mid March she will need to wrap the project up into a research paper.

If you can participate that would be wonderful! If you have any questions or want to know more about the project please let Raven know. You can send her questions or longer submissions at sexedconfidential@gmail.com. 

parislemon:

geeksofdoom:

Ghostbusters Goodbye
{by Ash Vickers MegaCynics}

Rest in peace, Harold Ramis.

parislemon:

geeksofdoom:

Ghostbusters Goodbye

{by Ash Vickers MegaCynics}

Rest in peace, Harold Ramis.

(via bingofuel)

Enjoying the sunshine on a lazy Caturday. #catsofinstagram

Enjoying the sunshine on a lazy Caturday. #catsofinstagram

A little rain can straighten a flower stem. A little love can change a life.

A little rain can straighten a flower stem. A little love can change a life.

Sunday night dinner is ready to go in the oven! I’m also serving Gnocchi and Dragonfruit! And afterwards we have an episode of Big Bang Theory to watch… Just need the kids home now.  (at Brookside Terrace)

Sunday night dinner is ready to go in the oven! I’m also serving Gnocchi and Dragonfruit! And afterwards we have an episode of Big Bang Theory to watch… Just need the kids home now. (at Brookside Terrace)

Coincidence. It’s what the universe does for… fun.

(Source: jaimeswhitecloak, via doctorwho)